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In this day and age, network optimization is as important as the hardware it optimizes. Here's an introduction to what it is.

19

Jun, 19

The Guide to Network Optimization

The Internet is not a single network, but a huge network of networks. It has grown so much in the past decades that there are about 7 billion internet-connected devices in the world and that number grows daily. Thanks to the internet-of-things (i.e. IoT), researchers expect there to be more than 64 billion devices that are connected to the internet by 2025.

The sheer number of internet-using devices and the fast rate of growth is putting severe pressure on the local networks that make up the internet. To combat this, simply having powerful resources are no longer sufficient. That is where network optimization comes into play.

So, what is network optimization? It is a set of technologies and methods that are geared towards improving network performance and health. It incorporates every single component of the network, from the workstation to the server, their processes and connections. Network optimization is done for the purposes of managing bandwidth utilization, minimizing latency and packet loss, as well as combatting congestion and jitter.

Network optimization tools (a.k.a. network optimizers) are widely used by network engineers in order to monitor the following factors:

  • Bandwidth consumption/utilization
  • Traffic
  • Latency & Jitter
  • Packet loss & Duplicate packets
  • CPU & Memory usage

All these factors must be held under a certain threshold which is defined based on performance capabilities of hardware and network providers. There is no general solution for all, as no 2 networks are the same. Thus, network engineers must monitor the aforementioned factors and make tweaks to the network based on what is needed for the said network.

Network optimization is essential to the end user experience and could also cut down business costs. Without it, packet loss could occur, which in turn would interfere with VoIP (i.e. Voice over IP) and database technology.