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At MonoVM we provide you with the underlying facts, assumptions and rules which a computer system has.

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We have officially launched our SSD VPS servers. For decades, hard disk drives have been used as the main storage devices in the IT field, but with the latest technological advancements, solid state storage has been becoming the next step in performance improvements for both consumer desktop computers and servers alike. Over the past few years, SSDs have become significantly larger in storage size, as well as becoming more affordable, allowing them to be implemented in more complex server configurations. Our VPS servers were previously all based on high-speed enterprise-grade Hard Disk...

09

Apr, 19

What is FTP and Its Uses

FTP’s History File Transfer Protocol (i.e. FTP) has been around for much longer than HTTP (i.e. Hypertext Transfer Protocol), which you are using right now to connect to the Internet. As a matter of fact, it is even older than TCP/IP protocol and over the 40+ years of its existence it has been modified to fit the new standards in the industry. Since the original specification for FTP was written in 1971, the first FTP clients were completely command-line programs, as they were developed before operating systems adopted the use of GUIs (i.e. Graphical User Interfaces). Nevertheless,...

15

Apr, 19

What is RAID and Why Use It

  • by Antoniy
  • in Server
  • View 282

It is not a secret that technology has been advancing at a rate previously unseen. All the performance numbers of all the hardware components we use today have risen annually in an exponential manner. Nevertheless, just like how in the automotive industry, packing a vehicle with pure horsepower won’t win you the race, in the IT world, performance improvements are not simply due to better hardware. There are countless incredibly genius solutions that can cause even old outdated hardware to outperform the “latest and greatest” on the market. Today we will focus on one of such...

Since its introduction in 1983, IPv4 has been the standard protocol for internet routing, however with the vast expansion of the internet, we have started to run out of the simple binary 32-bit IPv4 addresses. To solve this issue, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) developed the IPv6 protocol and it has been established as an Internet Standard in July of 2017. Its length is much larger at 128-bits, making it nearly impossible to reach address exhaustion. IPv6 also came with many advantages over IPv4, about which you can read here. Now we will demonstrate how to setup IPv6 on Windows...

15

Apr, 19

There is great functionality in having a fully working version of Windows that you could boot from any computer on something as small as a USB flash drive and today we will show you how to do it. All you need is a 16GB (recommended 32GB+) flash drive and a license to activate Windows on the USB. First of all, you will need to get a Windows ISO file with the version that you require. We are going to use WinToUSB, which has a free version of the program. There is a small caveat however; the free version of the program only supports Windows 10 versions 1803 (April 2018 release) and lower. In...

15

Apr, 19

Solid State Drives are a relatively new technology and are way too expensive to implement as an enterprise-level storage option. Hard drives have always been the go-to solution for large-scale storage needs. As the other computer components got better, the hard drives were not able to keep up with their rate of innovation. Researchers were simply running out of space where to put new platters into the standard 3.5-inch form factor. Western Digital has come up with a solution to this problem in a very unexpected way. They decided to fill the Hard Drives with Helium, a gas that has a density...

In general, most people assume that their bandwidth is their internet speed, however that is not true. It is simply the amount of data they can receive in a second. For example, if your internet provider offers you 100Mbps, it does not mean that you will have a download speed of 100 megabits per second, but that you could possibly receive 100 megabits every second with your connection. Your true internet speed comes from a combination of bandwidth and latency.   What is Latency? Latency is defined as the amount of time it takes to send information from one machine to another. It could...

18

Apr, 19

We are used to transmitting data through regular copper wires, however they come with a great deal of disadvantages. The reason for this is that copper wires use electrical signals to transmit data, creating challenges such as signal degradation, electromagnetic interference and low bandwidth limits. At some point in the last century, the entire internet relied on copper wires for worldwide data transmission, however innovation came from a completely unexpected direction. In the 1950s, optical fibers were originally developed for use in endoscopes to help doctors see inside the human body...

Since development of the first hard drive in 1956, which weighted over a thousand kilograms and stored only 5MB of data, storage technology has come a very long way. Modern drives can now store up to 12TB (i.e. 12 million MB) of data and reach up to 150 IOPS (i.e. Input/output Operations Per Second). Over the past few years however, the speed of innovation has slowed down and the rate at which the HDD capacity increases annually has decreased, as we are reaching the maximum possible data density on a single platter. This has led to development of new HDD storage technology such as filling the...

Both Telnet and Secure Shell (i.e. SSH) are network protocols used to connect to remote servers and both have been used widely at different points in time. Telnet is the original protocol that was used when the internet was first launched in 1969. It was developed to be used in private networks and has no security measures, making it irrelevent when used on public networks. This is the main reason why SSH was developed as a replacement for Telnet. We will discuss the differences between telnet and SSH, however lets first understand what each one is.   What is TELNET? Telnet is a...

26

Apr, 19

Htop is an interactive system monitor, process viewer and process manager designed for Unix systems. Originally designed as an alternative to the Unix program top, it provides much of the same functionality as top, but offers much greater flexibility over how system processes can be viewed. Unlike top, htop provides the full list of running processes instead of the top resource-consuming ones. Htop can display processes as a tree and uses color to provide resource-usage statistics. Here’s how the htop interface looks like: Now, let’s see what each field means, starting at the...

30

Apr, 19

Domain Name System BackLists (DNSBL) are spam blocking lists that allow system moderators to block messages from specific systems that have a history of sending spam.  As the name suggests, these lists are based on the Domain Name System (DNS) which converts numerical IP addresses into domain names. If the maintainer of the DNSBL receives spam from a specific domain name, that server would be blacklisted and all messages sent from it would either be flagged or rejected by any sites that uses the said list. There are three basic components that make up a DNSBL: A domain name to host...

What is clickjacking? Have you ever visited a website, clicked on an element you wanted to open and instead opened a pesky ad? Well, then you have experienced a clickjacking attack. To be more specific, it is an attack that tricks the user into clicking a webpage element that is invisible or disguised as another element. Here’s an example:   In the above screenshot taken from a video streaming site, the yellow arrow signifies the actual link that needs to be clicked to open the video, while the red arrow shows an example of a clickjacking attack. It is so because if the WATCH...